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Apple's Search Engine Negotiations With Google Took Months of Near-Daily Meetings

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Establishing a billion dollar search engine deal with Google took Apple more than four months, according to new details shared today by former Apple lawyer Bruce Sewell.

Sewell recently did an interview with a Columbia law student, which was noticed this afternoon by CNBC, and in the interview, he shared details on his time at Apple and some of the negotiations he handled for the company.


According to Sewell, he attended near daily meetings with Google CEO Sundar Pichai and Google lawyer Kent Walker when hammering out a deal, working alongside Tim Cook or Eddy Cue.
And then with myself and either Tim [Cook] or Eddy Cue who was my counterpart on that deal. They'd be at Google or we'd be at Apple almost every day, it's just one example there are a lot of those kinds of negotiations or lawsuits that just completely suck up all your time.
Sewell did not go into detail about the amount of money that Google pays Apple to be the primary search engine on Apple devices, but in the past, Google has been rumored to be paying billions for the privilege.

Sewell says that in his time at Apple, he had 900 people working under him. 600 of those were in the law group and included lawyers and paralegals.

In just one of the Samsung lawsuits, Apple had 350 people billing time on that case at any given moment, most of which were outside counsel because it's impossible for Apple to handle cases of that magnitude with an internal team. "And this was just one of them. There were seven of them going on," said Sewell.

There were seven or eight billion documents to review, and collectively, law firms billed Apple 280,000 hours. Sewell says his budget was "just shy of a billion dollars a year."

Sewell says that he steered Apple in the wrong direction on its iBooks negotiations, leading to the iBooks snafu with the U.S. government that cost Apple a lot of money because he didn't know about deals publishers made among themselves. Cook, though, was forgiving and said he'd made the right choices.
But that was an example of sailing as close to the wind because it was so important to Apple. But in the end, I got it wrong and Apple ended up having to pay a large fine. The reaction from Tim was "That's the right choice. You made the best choice that you could with the information you had. You didn't know about these other things. Don't let that scare you. I don't want you to stop pushing the envelope because that's why legal is an important function at the company."
During the interview, Sewell also shared a few tidbits about Apple CEO Tim Cook, who he said would send him emails in the very early morning due to Cook's "crazy" work schedule.
From 4:00 a.m. to 5 a.m., there's a there's a lot of activity, so my first thing when I got up around 6:30 a.m. would be to check my email and see all the stuff that Tim had left for me, the little cookies he's left for me.
Sewell had other thoughts to share on working as a traditional lawyer vs. working for a major company as legal counsel, and his shift from Intel to Apple, which he likened to going to kindergarten from university given Apple's focus on creativity. The full interview can be watched in the video up above.

From 2009 to 2017, Bruce Sewell served as Apple's general counsel before retiring at the end of 2017. Sewell has since been replaced by Katherine Adams.

Article Link: Apple's Search Engine Negotiations With Google Took Months of Near-Daily Meetings
 

ugahairydawgs

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Jun 10, 2010
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$1 billion: the price for Apple to abandon its stated goal of protecting its users’ privacy.

$9b if you believe the estimate done by Goldman.

This deal Apple has going with Google has often struck me as a little weird these last few years when Apple has been so focused on privacy and the respect of customer data. I use DuckDuckGo and it works good enough for me, but I doubt there are many that jump in there and change the search default preference.
 
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realtuner

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$9b if you believe the estimate done by Goldman.

This deal Apple has going with Google has often struck me as a little weird these last few years when Apple has been so focused on privacy and the respect of customer data. I use DuckDuckGo and it works good enough for me, but I doubt there are many that jump in there and change the search default preference.

$1 billion: the price for Apple to abandon its stated goal of promoting user privacy.

EDIT: changed “protecting” to “promoting”

Privacy intact since Google doesn't get a single bit of identifying information from my iOS devices (that is, if I actually used Google instead of DDG).
 
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JGIGS

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$1 billion: the price for Apple to abandon its stated goal of promoting user privacy.

EDIT: changed “protecting” to “promoting”

This is a nonsense statement.

How is it a nonsense statement when everyone in here complains how Google gives away your data and won't use their services/apps?

You can't have it both ways. Google can't be evil privacy breakers while Apple uses them as the default browser and are the masters of keeping your info private.
 
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Westside guy

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From 4:00 a.m. to 5 a.m., there's a there's a lot of activity, so my first thing when I got up around 6:30 a.m. would be to check my email and see all the stuff that Tim had left for me, the little cookies he's left for me.
Hmm, for Sewell’s browser?? :p

Little known fact: Part of Cook's "crazy work schedule" involves overnight baking binges followed by sneaking into senior executives' houses to leave baked goods on the kitchen counter.
 
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now i see it

macrumors 603
Jan 2, 2002
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Google may have paid  a $ billion to be the "default" search engine but I no longer use them for search anymore. There comes a time when enough tracking is enough.
I reach towards the Google icon out of habit , but always stop myself, remembering what a bad choice that is.
The fact that they paid a billion to be the default search engine for Apple is reason enough not to use them.
 
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realtuner

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How is it a nonsense statement when everyone in here complains how Google gives away your data and won't use their services/apps?

You can't have it both ways. Google can't be evil privacy breakers while Apple uses them as the default browser and are the masters of keeping your info private.

People still don't get this. Apple is sending ANONYMOUS data to Google. No real name, no AppleID, no e-mail address, no phone number, no IMEI, no DeviceID - nothing that could identify users.
 
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Pakaku

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Aug 29, 2009
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The fact that Apple still does business with Google is worrisome at best, and completely contradictory to their (supposed) morals in general

Even if the info is anonymous, they're still giving the false impression that people should be using Google as their default search engine, and indirectly promoting Google in the process where they can spy on you if you end up tempted into trying their other services (Gmail and so forth)
 
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goobot

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The fact that Apple still does business with Google is worrisome at best, and completely contradictory to their (supposed) morals in general

Even if the info is anonymous, they're still giving the false impression that people should be using Google as their default search engine, and indirectly promoting Google in the process where they can spy on you if you end up tempted into trying their other services (Gmail and so forth)
Realistically the mass majority would choose to use google as their search tool. Why would Apple pass up a billion to give their users what they want anyway? On top of that if they used anything else people would complain how bad the iPhone was a searching for things on the net.
 
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badatusernames

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Jul 1, 2018
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I am surprised Tim didn't fire him. I think that's one quality of a good leader (being able to forgive and understanding when needed)
 
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macfacts

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People still don't get this. Apple is sending ANONYMOUS data to Google. No real name, no AppleID, no e-mail address, no phone number, no IMEI, no DeviceID - nothing that could identify users.

But your IP and the search info you typed in is still sent to Google. Your privacy is gone. Most iOS users are not into customizations and will use the default. Apple is in charge of setting that default.
 
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I7guy

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$1 billion: the price for Apple to abandon its stated goal of promoting user privacy.

EDIT: changed “protecting” to “promoting”
How do you figure that? Should Apple say screw you to net neutrality? Block google from its devices? Does Apple send unsolicited user data to google? Might as well get paid as users will “google” anyway.
[doublepost=1560206331][/doublepost]
But your IP and the search info you typed in is still sent to Google. Your privacy is gone. Most iOS users are not into customizations and will use the default. Apple is in charge of setting that default.
And there is nothing wrong with choice. One can change these settings if they want. Good for Apple for getting paid for what users would do anyway.
[doublepost=1560206686][/doublepost]
How is it a nonsense statement when everyone in here complains how Google gives away your data and won't use their services/apps?

You can't have it both ways. Google can't be evil privacy breakers while Apple uses them as the default browser and are the masters of keeping your info private.
In this case you sure can have it both way. Should Apple forget about net neutrality and block google. Does Apple give away your data? iOS for Apple for being paid for what users would do anyway.
 
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DocMultimedia

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Luckily MacRumors preserves all your privacy as you type comments here. Lol. The only privacy left on the web is not being on the web. I think Apple making money from Google just to keep a default search engine a good deal for Apple. Disclosure: I own Apple stock. :)
 
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RudySnow

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This is a nonsense statement.

No, yours is. Google does absolutely nothing to protect users’ privacy. Apple knows it, and Cook discusses it often. Yet, they’ll take Google’s. Heck like a good little hypocrite. I’m surprised Facebook hasn’t paid Apple to get their app on iOS as a default if the money is that important.
[doublepost=1560208547][/doublepost]
People get it, they ignore it. Apple should do what they do and ignore the critics.

Yeah? Check how many cookies Google Analytics downloads into Safari and then tell us otherwise. If Google had no incentive to grab your data, why in the hell would they pay billions for nothing?
 
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