How hot does the mackbook pro 13" 2018 run on normal usage?

Kraizelburg

macrumors regular
Original poster
Nov 10, 2018
203
65
Spain
Hi, I'm about to purchase my first mackbook ever and I've been doubtfull between macbook pro 13 2018 and new MBA. But then I read about throttling issues on 2018 macbook pros line, I know apple released a patch that is supposed to "fix it" but I'd like to know from real owners what their experiences are regarding thermals.
I just dont wanna have an expensive toaster ;) I just hate hot and loud laptops.

BTW this it'd be my first Mac ever!!

Cheers
 

jakespeed

macrumors member
Jul 22, 2002
75
26
When just sitting here surfing MacRumors, my 2018 13" 2.3 runs between 38c and 46c sitting on my lap. The fans don't seem to kick on at all until it gets to around 50-60c. Doing a compile of C++ or running something else CPU heavy in Parallels will kick the fans up a bit and hit 90c before the fans cool things down to around 80 where its will stay. This is a bit hotter than my 2017 15" i7 which runs between 32-40c surfing the web and takes a bit longer to hit 90c. So my 13 doesn't get hotter...just warms up quicker I would say.

So I would call the thermals "ok" but not top notch. Then again, they crammed more power than the 2017 15" laptop into a 13" chassis so I don't think I'm going to complain.
 

meng8123

macrumors newbie
Nov 13, 2007
12
1
From my experience so far, it runs much hotter than my dad's 2017 15" Macbook Pro. I was thinking about changing the thermal paste, but reading the iFixit guide, I am not so sure I am willing to do all that just for few degrees change.

Has anyone done that on a 2018 Macbook pro 13" yet?
 

Appledoesnotlisten

macrumors member
Dec 2, 2017
70
18
Gents,

I now have a 15" '17 and am about to buy 13" '18 2.7 quad-core i7, but afraid that the 13" 2.7 quad-core i7 will get too hot. Should I choose a weaker processor or weaker processor is not going to give me a cooler machine?

Thanks!
 
Last edited:

1096bimu

macrumors 6502
Nov 7, 2017
319
286
Hi, I'm about to purchase my first mackbook ever and I've been doubtfull between macbook pro 13 2018 and new MBA. But then I read about throttling issues on 2018 macbook pros line, I know apple released a patch that is supposed to "fix it" but I'd like to know from real owners what their experiences are regarding thermals.
I just dont wanna have an expensive toaster ;) I just hate hot and loud laptops.

BTW this it'd be my first Mac ever!!

Cheers
There is no throttling issue any more.

If you run intensive tasks the machine will get hot, that's the end of it. Nobody knows what software you will actually run so we can't predict if it will get hot for you. However you can run a utility that forces the laptop to run slow but cool and quiet if you so choose.

The latest chips will always have the best efficiency so it will do the most things while generating the same amount of heat, and since I already said that you can limit the heat output with a software, the latest will always be the better choice, whether or not you choose to limit its power usage.
 

CodeJoy

macrumors 6502
Apr 3, 2018
400
586
Gents,

I now have a 15" '17 and am about to buy 13" '18 2.7 quad-core i7, but afraid that the 13" 2.7 quad-core i7 will get too hot. Should I choose a weaker processor or weaker processor is not going to give me a cooler machine?

Thanks!
Do yourself a favour and get the i5 model. With the i7 upgrade you're paying tons extra for what's effectively zero performance gain in real world workflows. It's a completely pointless upgrade, the i5 is the same chip only at slightly lower frequency. But the i7 ends up at similar frequencies anyway due to heat.
[doublepost=1541999281][/doublepost]
Hi, I'm about to purchase my first mackbook ever and I've been doubtfull between macbook pro 13 2018 and new MBA. But then I read about throttling issues on 2018 macbook pros line, I know apple released a patch that is supposed to "fix it" but I'd like to know from real owners what their experiences are regarding thermals.
I just dont wanna have an expensive toaster ;) I just hate hot and loud laptops.

BTW this it'd be my first Mac ever!!

Cheers
Well, when browsing the forums here, typing in a code editor, playing videos or whatever, it's perfectly cool and silent. It only gets hot under heavy load. Even the i5 does throttle, but I can't say if you actually lose any performance from it. Possibly not actually.
 
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1096bimu

macrumors 6502
Nov 7, 2017
319
286
Do yourself a favour and get the i5 model. With the i7 upgrade you're paying tons extra for what's effectively zero performance gain in real world workflows. It's a completely pointless upgrade, the i5 is the same chip only at slightly lower frequency. But the i7 ends up at similar frequencies anyway due to heat.
Except in most cases you are not running up against heat, I can run mine constantly at over 4Ghz.
Almost nobody runs R15 in loops as their "real world workflow".

Check out the 15" i7 versus i9 tests, the i9 is like 20% faster in Lightroom and Photoshop tests, and that i7 clocks to 4.0 Ghz. Expect similar if not more difference between the 13" i7 and i5.
 

CodeJoy

macrumors 6502
Apr 3, 2018
400
586
Except in most cases you are not running up against heat, I can run mine constantly at over 4Ghz.
Almost nobody runs R15 in loops as their "real world workflow".

Check out the 15" i7 versus i9 tests, the i9 is like 20% faster in Lightroom and Photoshop tests, and that i7 clocks to 4.0 Ghz. Expect similar if not more difference between the 13" i7 and i5.
Even if it is 20%, which I highly doubt for real world tests, it's nowhere near worth it for just about anyone. You only get the speedup when you're running at max load, and I doubt regular users do that more than 5% of the time at most. So you're down to a 1% improvement at best for your overall workflow, and for that Apple is asking the cost of two CPU's. So you're paying 100% more for a 1% improvement. That only makes sense for people who have more money than they know what to do with, and have to find ways to get rid of it.
 
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Appledoesnotlisten

macrumors member
Dec 2, 2017
70
18
Do yourself a favour and get the i5 model. With the i7 upgrade you're paying tons extra for what's effectively zero performance gain in real world workflows. It's a completely pointless upgrade, the i5 is the same chip only at slightly lower frequency. But the i7 ends up at similar frequencies anyway due to heat.
Refurbished store has July 2018 16Gb either in i5 dual core or i7 qaud core.
Even if it is 20%, which I highly doubt for real world tests, it's nowhere near worth it for just about anyone. You only get the speedup when you're running at max load, and I doubt regular users do that more than 5% of the time at most. So you're down to a 1% improvement at best for your overall workflow, and for that Apple is asking the cost of two CPU's. So you're paying 100% more for a 1% improvement. That only makes sense for people who have more money than they know what to do with, and have to find ways to get rid of it.
Thanks man. I got refurbished i5 QuadCore 16/256. Seems like a good value for money. Arriving tomorrow!
 

CodeJoy

macrumors 6502
Apr 3, 2018
400
586
Refurbished store has July 2018 16Gb either in i5 dual core or i7 qaud core.

Thanks man. I got refurbished i5 QuadCore 16/256. Seems like a good value for money. Arriving tomorrow!
Nod of approval has been granted. ;-). I agree it's reasonable value for money, and as such it's the exact model I got for myself too. :)
 

1096bimu

macrumors 6502
Nov 7, 2017
319
286
Even if it is 20%, which I highly doubt for real world tests, it's nowhere near worth it for just about anyone. You only get the speedup when you're running at max load, and I doubt regular users do that more than 5% of the time at most. So you're down to a 1% improvement at best for your overall workflow, and for that Apple is asking the cost of two CPU's. So you're paying 100% more for a 1% improvement. That only makes sense for people who have more money than they know what to do with, and have to find ways to get rid of it.
You do not get it when running at max load, you just don't understand how processors work do you?
You get it when you run it at what most people run it at, burst loads, things like applying a filter, exporting an image.

You are also not paying 100% more, you pay 14% more for 20% more performance, I don't see what's the problem here. People are just jealous of specs higher than that of their own.
 

CodeJoy

macrumors 6502
Apr 3, 2018
400
586
You do not get it when running at max load, you just don't understand how processors work do you?
You get it when you run it at what most people run it at, burst loads, things like applying a filter, exporting an image.

You are also not paying 100% more, you pay 14% more for 20% more performance, I don't see what's the problem here.
You get it when running max load in bursts. When you're not using the CPU you don't get any improvement. There's no reason to be an idiot just because I didn't spell out every last detail for you.

And I'm not sure how you're counting, but if you look up the recommended customer price on intel's site, you'll find that the delta price between the i5 and i7 is on the order of $135. Apple is asking $300 for this upgrade. So they're adding a 120% margin, just because they can. Even Intel's price is quite silly imo, given that you don't get much for it.

People are just jealous of specs higher than that of their own.
So you think the i7-8559U has specs to be jealous of? You know that it has the performance of a $100 desktop chip? I recently built a $230 toy machine that beats the $2300 MBP on performance. My regular low end desktop box is around 3x the performance for CPU, and probably 20x+ for graphics. Not sure where you're coming from, but if you think people are jealous of $230 toy box performance, then you're severely misguided. Apple's upgrade prices are sick ripoffs. If people choose to get ripped off, that's their business, but I'm certainly going to continue to inform those who don't know and appreciate to be better informed.