iPhone 11 Pro Optimize charging : I’m giving up.

FlyingDutch

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Original poster
Aug 21, 2019
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There should be a power-strip with a timer on it.

You could set it for a couple hours when you charge your phone at night. Then it will turn off and stop charging.

Seems easy enough! :p
As i said before there are many available, the easiest being just to recharge the phone one hour before going to sleep, since the iPhone drains overnight is ridiculously slow at idle (1% max).
The point of the thread was to discuss a broken functionality with others to understand if there is a common pattern on non-working users.

By the way your suggested solution is less efficient than Apple’s because it will top the battery and keep it out of charge but at 100% for hours, while Optimized Charging would take it at 80% for most of the time.
I agree is a very negligible difference (the battery is still discharging even if 100% is showed), but still a difference 🤷🏻‍♂️
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Yes it’s weird isn’t it? Personally it works for me and all family members. But completely understand frustration of people here on forum for whom it’s not working, especially those with regular charging patterns which apples machine learning algorithm ought to work for easily.
This is the whole point of the discussion.
Why is it not working on users (like me) with Bed Time set up every single day, when the iPhone could easily predicts when I’m going to wake up in the morning ?
 
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Michael Scrip

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Mar 4, 2011
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By the way your suggested solution is less efficient than Apple’s because it will top the battery and keep it out of charge but at 100% for hours, while Optimized Charging would take it at 80% for most of the time.
I agree is a very negligible difference (the battery is still discharging even if 100% is showed), but still a difference 🤷🏻‍♂️
True.

My solution would prevent the phone from being crammed with power for many many hours once the phone is full... which is some people's concern here. ;)

But you're right. It would be nice if Apple's solution worked (reliably)
 

wardie

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Aug 18, 2008
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If anyone knows of an app for the iPhone which can read he battery level and export that somehow then it would be straightforward to build some IoT home automation with a home hub plus a smart switch to implement your own learning charging solution. Simples. Ish. I looked but the default presence sensor for my samsung SmartThings app doesn’t do this, otherwise I’d give it a go for fun.
 

tonybarnaby

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Dec 3, 2017
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I actually think this should be a choice for lighter users. There was an Android app that could do it, but I don't know if any exist for iOS.
Accubattery. You can have it set off an alarm at any charge level, but no app can stop the charge cycle without root.
 

tonybarnaby

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Dec 3, 2017
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18-24 months of charging to 100% while I sleep is way more valuable to me than doing 40-80 and getting 3 years from my battery. I used to have severe battery OCD, and I can't state enough how free I feel to not worry about it anymore. If the phone was a paperweight once the battery died then I get it. We're talking about a $49-$79 replacement that will take 18+ months for any user to need. I can't imagine any scenario where someone NEEDS the battery to last 3 years. We would all prefer that, but watching charge levels and not charging while I sleep is not worth it to me. There is no legitimate reason anyone NEEDS to baby their battery except for OCD or other reasons
 

nicho

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Feb 15, 2008
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Hasn't ever worked for me with my iPhone X either.

I did get a notification once, at about 3pm and nowhere near a power outlet, that optimized charging was active...
 

FlyingDutch

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Original poster
Aug 21, 2019
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True.

My solution would prevent the phone from being crammed with power for many many hours once the phone is full... which is some people's concern here. ;)

But you're right. It would be nice if Apple's solution worked (reliably)
Is it working on your phone ?
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18-24 months of charging to 100% while I sleep is way more valuable to me than doing 40-80 and getting 3 years from my battery. I used to have severe battery OCD, and I can't state enough how free I feel to not worry about it anymore. If the phone was a paperweight once the battery died then I get it. We're talking about a $49-$79 replacement that will take 18+ months for any user to need. I can't imagine any scenario where someone NEEDS the battery to last 3 years. We would all prefer that, but watching charge levels and not charging while I sleep is not worth it to me. There is no legitimate reason anyone NEEDS to baby their battery except for OCD or other reasons
Ok, this is your choice and nobody is going to try to change your mind.
BTW the topic is about a functionality Apple implemented (they clearly doesn’t share your idea about battery health) and seems not to works as designed.
 

coffeeplease

macrumors member
Sep 28, 2019
63
25
I remember the early betas causing battery to drain with optimized charging. Does it still drain having this on (from all the "machine learning" it needs to do)? Since this feature doesn't even work, should I just turn it off?
 

kevink2

macrumors 65816
Nov 2, 2008
1,381
128
I went looking at things today since my phone has said SERVICE for battery health for over a month. It goes to 100% at night and stays there.

Luckily it seems to work otherwise, and not shutoff during normal use, since the battery in my X is apparently unreplaceable due to stripped screw (according to Apple store). I was considering upgrading next fall anyway. This just means I can't hand down the phone, but will have to try the trade in program at apple.
 

nicho

macrumors 68030
Feb 15, 2008
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And out of nowhere, it worked last night.

I’m wondering if it has anything to do with the time it is put on charge. It’s probably the first time I’ve put it down within half an hour of my “bed time” as registered in the Clock app since ios13 came out. I wonder if putting it on too late means the wake time is ignored and optimised charging fails.
 

compwiz1202

macrumors 6502a
May 20, 2010
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I wasn't even thinking of something so fancy... just a simple timer:

Heck my dad has the old school round one with the switches for each half hour you can set to on or off.
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As i said before there are many available, the easiest being just to recharge the phone one hour before going to sleep, since the iPhone drains overnight is ridiculously slow at idle (1% max).
The point of the thread was to discuss a broken functionality with others to understand if there is a common pattern on non-working users.

By the way your suggested solution is less efficient than Apple’s because it will top the battery and keep it out of charge but at 100% for hours, while Optimized Charging would take it at 80% for most of the time.
I agree is a very negligible difference (the battery is still discharging even if 100% is showed), but still a difference 🤷🏻‍♂️
- - Post merged: - -


This is the whole point of the discussion.
Why is it not working on users (like me) with Bed Time set up every single day, when the iPhone could easily predicts when I’m going to wake up in the morning ?
Same for me. Does weekdays only mess with it, or does snoozing mess with it. I've yet to see the notification about optimized charging, and I definitely checked, and it is enabled.
 
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FlippyGonnaSnap

macrumors regular
Oct 23, 2019
181
107
Again you can believe whatever please you and claim to be whatever you want.
that doesn’t change the fact you are giving uninformed advices about batteries.
it doesn’t take a decade to ruin a relatively small battery, and the fact that Apple itself introduced the functionality is here to prove you wrong.
The only person giving uninformed information about batteries is the person relying on clickbait articles which typically highlight worst case scenarios despite having mysterious “experience in the field”.

I’m relying on actual real life experience having worked in IT, in a small team and having to provide support for literal thousands of devices with batteries.

Laptops that were plugged in 99% of the time for many months to years? Yea the batteries were dead, either holding charge for less time then it takes to make a coffee or nothing at all. Still got lucky with a few that held up well despite the same usage though.

When it comes to phones or tablets that were issued however and were used normally as portable devices are intended? I’d say roughly 400 were given out and we had the batteries replaced on roughly less then a dozen after being in the role for four years (many of those were iPad 2’s which were rolled out well before I started) and some of them were in cases of where it had been left in a car during the summer months.

Please stop spreading your paranoia on to others and let them enjoy the thing.
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Doesn’t take any sort of variety in to consideration at all rendering it completely useless.

Also lacks the source, testing conditions and sample size.
 
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FlyingDutch

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Aug 21, 2019
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The only person giving uninformed information about batteries is the person relying on clickbait articles which typically highlight worst case scenarios despite having mysterious “experience in the field”.

I’m relying on actual real life experience having worked in IT, in a small team and having to provide support for literal thousands of devices with batteries.

Laptops that were plugged in 99% of the time for many months to years? Yea the batteries were dead, either holding charge for less time then it takes to make a coffee or nothing at all. Still got lucky with a few that held up well despite the same usage though.

When it comes to phones or tablets that were issued however and were used normally as portable devices are intended? I’d say roughly 400 were given out and we had the batteries replaced on roughly less then a dozen after being in the role for four years (many of those were iPad 2’s which were rolled out well before I started) and some of them were in cases of where it had been left in a car during the summer months.

Please stop spreading your paranoia on to others and let them enjoy the thing.
- - Post merged: - -


Doesn’t take any sort of variety in to consideration at all rendering it completely useless.

Also lacks the source, testing conditions and sample size.
As I said, you are free to do whatever you want with your devices, but that doesn’t make your baseless anecdotal evidence more true.
as somebody already showed you, there are plenty of evidence about the issue.
and dismissing one of the most competent websites as “uselessl” is utterly ridiculous.
 
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FlippyGonnaSnap

macrumors regular
Oct 23, 2019
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Looks like it's time for you to do your homework

Time for you to gain real life experience.

Also I’m not debating how they degrade.


As I said, you are free to do whatever you want with your devices, but that doesn’t make your baseless anecdotal evidence more true.
as somebody already showed you, there are plenty of evidence about the issue.
and dismissing one of the most competent websites as “uselessl” is utterly ridiculous.

Seeing it and experiencing it with my own eyes with a sample size of hundreds of devices does give me an informed opinion though. Especially considering you then get a wide range of REAL USE performance with real people using it for work.

Im not saying that applying these ridiculous charging habits won’t improve your chances of slightly better health long term, I’m saying that the sacrifices made for the pay-off are absurd considering all the varieties of use cases for those batteries.

Results from a controlled laboratory test can only be relied upon to a certain extent. Also yes anything that lacks all details such as the specific conditions is useless. If the lab is really hot then yea charging it for far longer will cause far more damage.
 
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FlyingDutch

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Time for you to gain real life experience.

Also I’m not debating how they degrade.

Seeing it and experiencing it with my own eyes with a sample size of hundreds of devices does give me an informed opinion though. Especially considering you then get a wide range of REAL USE performance with real people using it for work.

Im not saying that applying these ridiculous charging habits won’t improve your chances of slightly better health long term, I’m saying that the sacrifices made for the pay-off are absurd considering all the varieties of use cases for those batteries.

Results from a controlled laboratory test can only be relied upon to a certain extent. Also yes anything that lacks all details such as the specific conditions is useless. If the lab is really hot then yea charging it for far longer will cause far more damage.
So, to sum it up, the only thing that counts is your anecdotal evidence.
Everything else is dismissed as useless 😆
Even if any law of chemical is saying otherwise.
 

FlippyGonnaSnap

macrumors regular
Oct 23, 2019
181
107
So, to sum it up, the only thing that counts is your anecdotal evidence.
Everything else is dismissed as useless 😆
Even if any law of chemical is saying otherwise.
The chemical reaction can be very inconsistent and not all batteries are the same. Environmental conditions play a huge role, drops can even have a major impact because the batteries are sensitive. The ways that batteries degrade are not a simple mathmatical equation.

You spouted you’re so called experienced in the industry but have yet to give any information in regards to that. I’m not giving anecdotal evidence, I’ve collected an incredibly large sample size based on being in IT where we would handle the likes of phones, tablets and laptops.

According to your logic no battery over a decade old should be functioning but they are and some are still doing incredibly well.

Love how you are now resorting to condescending emojis by the way.
 
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FlyingDutch

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Aug 21, 2019
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713
Eindhoven (NL)
The chemical reaction can be very inconsistent and not all batteries are the same. Environmental conditions play a huge role, drops can even have a major impact because the batteries are sensitive. The ways that batteries degrade are not a simple mathmatical equation.

You spouted you’re so called experienced in the industry but have yet to give any information in regards to that. I’m not giving anecdotal evidence, I’ve collected an incredibly large sample size based on being in IT where we would handle the likes of phones, tablets and laptops.

According to your logic no battery over a decade old should be functioning but they are and some are still doing incredibly well.

Love how you are now resorting to condescending emojis by the way.
“Incredibly large sample” 😂

Ok Ok... it is a waste of my time. Bye.