Justice Department Wants Apple to Extract Data From 12 Other iPhones

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacRumors, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. duffman9000 macrumors 68000

    duffman9000

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    #26
    Why do it once when you can multiply the cost by 13 (and counting)! Government work at its finest.
     
  2. CmdrLaForge macrumors 601

    CmdrLaForge

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    #27
    I hope Apple comes to its senses and helps as well in those cases.
     
  3. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

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    #28
    Fraud with the intent to commit acts of terrorism. And terrorist speeding, obviously.
     
  4. duffman9000 macrumors 68000

    duffman9000

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    #29
    MS has been dead quiet over this, but it's been guessed that MS are already in the NSA's back pocket.
     
  5. keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    #30
    Are you being serious?
     
  6. avanpelt macrumors 68030

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    #31
    This is why Tim Cook and Apple as a whole are right to stand their ground. Everyone knew this was a slippery slope and the Justice Department couldn't even wait until they had access to one phone before they started asking to get access to more phones.

    The government is like the person who goes to the buffet telling themselves that they should only get one plate of fruit and they come back with six plates containing half the buffet and say "I just couldn't help myself -- it all looked SO good!"
     
  7. CmdrLaForge macrumors 601

    CmdrLaForge

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    #32
    What it shows is there are unfortunately a lot of evil people around whose phones need to be unlocked. And Tim isn't right on this.
     
  8. lewisd25 macrumors 6502a

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    #33
    Requiring all communication devices to have a software backdoor will be the next step. We just have to wait for those idiots in Congress to devise a new bill and figure out a catchy acronym, then it is gg to personal privacy.
     
  9. kc2kth macrumors member

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    #34
    This is precisely what we all have been saying. Simply creating this backdoor opens the floodgates for it to happen everywhere. Some things simply shouldn't be created even if we have the ability to create them.
     
  10. CmdrLaForge macrumors 601

    CmdrLaForge

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    #35
    Are you? Supporting terrorism?
     
  11. Henry 3 Dogg macrumors newbie

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    #36
    "The U.S. government previously said that investigators are only seeking access to a single iPhone related to the San Bernardino attacks..."

    Strange then that they demanded tools that would help them obtain generic access to any iPhone, rather than simply asking that Apple break into the device for them.
     
  12. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

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    #37
    The phone in question is a 5c. From the 5s onward, new firmware wouldn't make a difference anymore. But the ability to control firmware updates is obviously not in the firmware, so I don't think Apple could do this with a firmware upgrade.

    Of course Apple could offer cheap upgrades to a 5s for all owners of older phones. Guess what, they actually do!
     
  13. duffman9000 macrumors 68000

    duffman9000

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    #38
    Why do you hate freedom? Why are you with the terrorists?
     
  14. Krandor macrumors 6502

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    #39
    Ah but here is the rub. Let's say Apple loses but then increases security even more. So next round a precent has been set to use development time to hack the phone. Would Apple now still be required to find some way to hack into and bypass their own security? Or will they then be requied to always have a way to get into the phone on FBI request (i.e. a backdoor)? That is the larger issue at stake. What is the requirement of a comapny in regards to warrants as security gets better and better?
     
  15. keysofanxiety macrumors G3

    keysofanxiety

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    #40
    The end does not justify the means. If there's a backdoor for iOS floating around, that's readily available to circumvent all security on any iOS device, this has far larger implications than what you're describing. How can you not see this?

    That ridiculous knee-jerk personal accusation in no way validates your argument. Rather, it does the opposite. Playing on people's fears and ignorance of the larger fallout from such a situation is exactly what the FBI wants.
     
  16. gnasher729, Feb 23, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016

    gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

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    #41
    4 digit passcode is 10,000 combinations. With the artificial delay and the erasure after 10 failed attempts, you could hire an intern to crack such a phone within a day or two. 6 digit passcode takes obviously 100 times longer. Still doable if you really, really want the data. 8 random digits and uppercase / lowercase letter, and it takes about 500,000 years even if they build some hardware that taps the numbers at the maximum rate possible.

    There is a minimum time of 0.08 seconds per attempt. That's how long it takes to check any passcode, assuming that it takes zero time to enter a passcode. So you just multiply 0.08 by the number of combinations. My number was 62 (10 digits + 26 lowercase + 26 uppercase) raised to the 8th power (8 letters and digits). Apple says "5 1/2 years for six numbers and digits". 8 would be 62 x 62 times worse.

    Wrong. First, by design the phone can only be unlocked if you are using the processor of that particular phone. Even if you put the hard drive into another phone, that phone couldn't unlock anything and couldn't read anything. Second, the 80ms "delay" is not a delay. That's how long it takes to check the passcode. By design.
     
  17. Jax44 macrumors 6502a

    Jax44

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    #42
    Jaywalking
     
  18. Krandor macrumors 6502

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    #43
    I think I read somewhere that even if they get what they want an alphanumer code would be something like 162 years.
     
  19. ozziegn macrumors 6502a

    ozziegn

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    #44
    Why can't Apple just say something like, "After several attempts, none of our software engineers are able to produce this back-door thingy like we thought we could."

    Then what? Apple tells the government, too bad so sad. If you want the back-door access, create it and help yourself.
     
  20. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

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    #45
    Listen to someone who actually knows what they are talking about. Breaking iPhone encryption actually endangers national security. Are you suggesting to support terrorism by giving terrorists access to data stored on the phones of government employees? Seriously, that _is_ the problem. If you give the good guys the tools to hack into the bad guys' phones, then the bad guys will get the tools to hack into the good guys phones. And overall, you lose.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/02/21/ex-nsa-chief-backs-apple-iphone-back-doors/80660024/
     
  21. DaveMcM76 macrumors regular

    DaveMcM76

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    #46
    Not going to work as the iCloud backup doesn't contain the passcode - the passcode only exists on the device where it is set...
     
  22. WBRacing macrumors 65816

    WBRacing

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    #47
    No cases, it's just that the idiots there keep forgetting their passcodes...
     
  23. GooMan macrumors regular

    GooMan

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    #48
    Exactly why I use a 14 character alphanumeric password on my iPhone. TouchID takes care of the day to day unlocking and if you ever get stopped by the cops, raided, ordered to turn over the phone, etc just turn off the iPhone quickly.

    No, I'm not a criminal and I have ZERO things to hide on my iPhone. I do it because I can and for the principle of it.
     
  24. macfacts macrumors 68040

    macfacts

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    #49

    Why shouldn't it happen? As long as the guy is a suspected criminal and there is a court order from a judge.
     
  25. koulmj Suspended

    koulmj

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    #50

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