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WRChris

macrumors 6502a
Aug 17, 2016
680
949
Indiana
Sometimes the CPSC did. Sometimes people had to resort to class actions.

It might be over a longer timeline (or at least, it took longer for Apple to acknowledge), but plenty of Apple products have sent people to the hospital, caused multiple fires and evacuations on airliners, and burnt down at least one house (even the Note hasn't done that). In the US alone:

US Recalls:
  • 2001 - Apple recalls 570,000 adapters with fire hazard sold 1998-2000.
  • 2004 - Apple recalls 28,000 laptop batteries with internal short.
  • 2005 - Apple recalls 128,000 laptop batteries with internal short.
  • 2006 - Apple recalls 1.1 million (1.8M worldwide) battery packs with fire hazard, injuries, property damage.
(That last recall involved as many batteries in the US, as Samsung Note 7 phones sold there.)

US Class Action Settlements:
  • 2008 - 2.3 million adapters w/fire hazard sold since 2001, took two years to settle.
  • 2011 - 10 million power connectors, fire hazard since 2006, took two years to settle.
Some people say, oh well these things happened over a longer time. That's almost worse. Remind me to steal ten bucks from you every week over ten years, because you don't think that counts the same as robbing you of the same amount over a month.

Samsung had a problem they couldn't figure out and stopped sales within weeks. Apple has had KNOWN problems for a decade at a time, and yet continued to sell the faulty products because it was cheaper to just pay for damages / replacements when victims came in, and let their PR team handle the fallout.

It doesn't matter how long it takes; the net effect on customers is the same in the end.

"Samsung had a problem they couldn't figure out and stopped sales within a week".
Seems to me a battery defect would be easy to determine, which makes me think it's not battery related but circuitry and/or battery defect. Needless to say, the fact that the airports have banned this device will do far more PR damage than settling in a class action lawsuit.
 

Sasparilla

macrumors 68000
Jul 6, 2012
1,851
3,190
Not too suprising that alot would stick with Samsung, they've probably had multiple Sammy phones before and the others aren't supposed to blow up...so...

Apple need to step up and offer double off whatever Samsung offers. But they won't, they're too greedy.

No, they'd get purchases anyways. Apple's problem is they have no 7+'s to sell at this point. iStockNow shows very little available (and was in an Apple Store in Chicago suburbs yesterday where that was confirmed). Whether its the camera selling more people on the 7+ or Note 7 buyers already snapping them up, Apple doesn't really have much 7+ stock to sell to these people.
 
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apolloa

Suspended
Oct 21, 2008
12,318
7,801
Time, because it rules EVERYTHING!
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KPOM

macrumors P6
Oct 23, 2010
17,436
6,845
Then you should throw away your Apple products too. Apple has been through worse cases of fire prone devices. And unlike Samsung, Apple denied that problems existed until after class action suits were already kicking their butt.
So where are these news reports? Any Li-ion device can explode. Apple iPhones have an ordinary rate of failure. 96 out of 2.5 million is not normal.
 
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keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,534
25,297
Really:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...g-his-iphone-charging-overnight-a6853601.html

That is not FUD, it is someone who died as the result of an overheating iPhone fact!

"Jonathan Fuguet, of Bureau Veritas Laboratories, who was employed to investigate by Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service, confirmed the overheating of the iPhone battery had caused the fire because the device was on the bed covers and the heat was unable to circulate freely."

It is FUD because you're implying there's a manufacturing defect that Apple are trying to cover up, as you said with "Apple's faulty devices are costing lives". This is nothing like the Note issue. Nothing like it at all. I can't believe I need to explain this.
 

KPOM

macrumors P6
Oct 23, 2010
17,436
6,845
Hey, giving store credit (or even ten cent rubber bumpers) has worked many times in the past for Apple when they had PR problems.

It's a clever way to look good, while encouraging people spend even more on your products.
Or it's a sign of desperation. Perhaps lots more people are opting for refunds than they expected.
 

I7guy

macrumors Nehalem
Nov 30, 2013
31,638
20,584
Gotta be in it to win it

unplugme71

macrumors 68030
May 20, 2011
2,827
754
Earth
This is exactly why I hate and left Samsung. Their dishwashers were horrible ended up buying kitchen aid for the rest of my appliances and replacing the Samsung dishwasher. Did Samsung do anything? No.

I had a Samsung washer and dryer. I had repair people come out 1-2x a month sometimes more frequently for 12 months because samsungs policy is to spend as much money as possible in repairs but never replace the actual unit or credit for return. The store finally took it back because they were furious what I was going through. Then they force $600 for each machine warranties through the mail for what I paid $650 each for. Really. Spend $1200 to protect $1300?

The last straw with the phone.. now only $100.

Goodbye Samsung. You are ****!

Apple is so much better to its customers if you don't scream but are firm with your demands.

Every Apple issue I've had was resolved and was never left feeling burned.
 

apolloa

Suspended
Oct 21, 2008
12,318
7,801
Time, because it rules EVERYTHING!
"Jonathan Fuguet, of Bureau Veritas Laboratories, who was employed to investigate by Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service, confirmed the overheating of the iPhone battery had caused the fire because the device was on the bed covers and the heat was unable to circulate freely."

It is FUD because you're implying there's a manufacturing defect that Apple are trying to cover up, as you said with "Apple's faulty devices are costing lives". This is nothing like the Note issue. Nothing like it at all. I can't believe I need to explain this.

What an awesome attempt of defelection from the truth.
Do Apple provide a big warning sign advising not to leave your iphone lying on a bed whilst charging then? Because that is the only way the story would be classed as FUD.
I think it's offensive you are apologising for Apple even though an iPhone caused the death of someone.
Perhaps we should link the endless iPhone burning people stories their are out there?
 

KPOM

macrumors P6
Oct 23, 2010
17,436
6,845
Sometimes the CPSC did. Sometimes people had to resort to class actions.

It might be over a longer timeline (or at least, it took longer for Apple to acknowledge), but plenty of Apple products have sent people to the hospital, caused multiple fires and evacuations on airliners, and burnt down at least one house (even the Note hasn't done that). In the US alone:

US Recalls:
  • 2001 - Apple recalls 570,000 adapters with fire hazard sold 1998-2000.
  • 2004 - Apple recalls 28,000 laptop batteries with internal short.
  • 2005 - Apple recalls 128,000 laptop batteries with internal short.
  • 2006 - Apple recalls 1.1 million (1.8M worldwide) battery packs with fire hazard, injuries, property damage.
(That last recall involved as many batteries in the US, as Samsung Note 7 phones sold there.)

US Class Action Settlements:
  • 2008 - 2.3 million adapters w/fire hazard sold since 2001, took two years to settle.
  • 2011 - 10 million power connectors, fire hazard since 2006, took two years to settle.
Some people say, oh well these things happened over a longer time. That's almost worse. Remind me to steal ten bucks from you every week over ten years, because you don't think that counts the same as robbing you of the same amount over a month.

Samsung had a problem they couldn't figure out and stopped sales within weeks. Apple has had KNOWN problems for a decade at a time, and yet continued to sell the faulty products because it was cheaper to just pay for damages / replacements when victims came in, and let their PR team handle the fallout.

It doesn't matter how long it takes; the net effect on customers is the same in the end.
However, Samsung recalled and then re-released a device that was unsafe. We don't have any evidence that Apple re-released any device that was unsafe. I get it that you don't like Apple. It's obvious from your posts but Apple is far more responsible than Samsung was with the Note 7. Samsung rushed the device to market and then completely botched the recall by reissuing it before they identified the fundamental problem with the device. And then they still spent weeks denying their was a problem. It took the carriers making unilateral decisions not to sell the device for Samsung to "voluntarily" stop sales.
 

I7guy

macrumors Nehalem
Nov 30, 2013
31,638
20,584
Gotta be in it to win it
Sometimes the CPSC did. Sometimes people had to resort to class actions.

It might be over a longer timeline (or at least, it took longer for Apple to acknowledge), but plenty of Apple products have sent people to the hospital, caused multiple fires and evacuations on airliners, and burnt down at least one house (even the Note hasn't done that). In the US alone:

US Recalls:
  • 2001 - Apple recalls 570,000 adapters with fire hazard sold 1998-2000.
  • 2004 - Apple recalls 28,000 laptop batteries with internal short.
  • 2005 - Apple recalls 128,000 laptop batteries with internal short.
  • 2006 - Apple recalls 1.1 million (1.8M worldwide) battery packs with fire hazard, injuries, property damage.
(That last recall involved as many batteries in the US, as Samsung Note 7 phones sold there.)

US Class Action Settlements:
  • 2008 - 2.3 million adapters w/fire hazard sold since 2001, took two years to settle.
  • 2011 - 10 million power connectors, fire hazard since 2006, took two years to settle.
Some people say, oh well these things happened over a longer time. That's almost worse. Remind me to steal ten bucks from you every week over ten years, because you don't think that counts the same as robbing you of the same amount over a month.

Samsung had a problem they couldn't figure out and stopped sales within weeks. Apple has had KNOWN problems for a decade at a time, and yet continued to sell the faulty products because it was cheaper to just pay for damages / replacements when victims came in, and let their PR team handle the fallout.

It doesn't matter how long it takes; the net effect on customers is the same in the end.
This is GTN(good to know), but it has nothing to do with Samsung sending out devices that catch fire after it was recalled, or a global aircraft ban. If you didn't post the information above, I would have never have known it, but people will be talking about the Note 7 debacle for years. It's hard to not know, especially if you travel the skies. To me this post represents a false equivalency.

You can bet your dollar, if apple had devices blowing up left, right and center, something would have been done like this as well.
 

nurban1992

macrumors member
Mar 1, 2015
56
47
$100 is just not enough. Although, I get it – they've had some big financial losses because of this. Good, they deserve it. Even still, a credit of that size is not enough to forgive this issue. Maybe for those who haven't had an incident and just want a new phone, but for those with an incident, they should receive full credit back plus an extra $100 to apologize.

However, in my eyes, Samsung should never be trusted again. I even read an article today noting an incident where the battery "bursted" on a Galaxy S7 Active in an office while the owner was away, potentially due to the Samsung wireless charging pad used generating too much heat. Their lack of quality control extends (albeit to a lesser extent) beyond the Note 7. They were so desperate to get these devices out before the iPhone 7 that they rushed them. How utterly pathetic that they put beating their competitor to market above quality and the safety of their customers.

IMO, they're deserving of every penny that they've lost, and so much more on top of it. I wish people wouldn't be so foolish to trust their misappropriated and logically-misguided engineers to create a truly good product again. Their intentions are of the wrong mindset.

Leave quality engineering up to Apple.
 

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,534
25,297
What an awesome attempt of defelection from the truth.
Do Apple provide a big warning sign advising not to leave your iphone lying on a bed whilst charging then? Because that is the only way the story would be classed as FUD.
I think it's offensive you are apologising for Apple even though an iPhone caused the death of someone.
Perhaps we should link the endless iPhone burning people stories their are out there?

Nobody would ever claim that iPhones will or have never seen similar issues. They're carrying lithium ion batteries in them, as do all phones. Any phone that has a battery punctured or overheats to a certain point (that being, completely smothered while charging) will exhibit similar issues. That is why you will always find these stories with any phone, regardless of make or manufacturer.

At least take the time to vaguely look into how battery technology works, or what a manufacturing defect actually means.
 

I7guy

macrumors Nehalem
Nov 30, 2013
31,638
20,584
Gotta be in it to win it
What an awesome attempt of defelection from the truth.
Do Apple provide a big warning sign advising not to leave your iphone lying on a bed whilst charging then? Because that is the only way the story would be classed as FUD.
I think it's offensive you are apologising for Apple even though an iPhone caused the death of someone.
Perhaps we should link the endless iPhone burning people stories their are out there?
Your post was the deflection. Had nothing to do with the fires, recall or subsequent fires other than a cheap shot. Apple's phone were not subject to a CPSC recall, recalled then rereleased claiming the problem was fixed only to find out, the issue hadn't been fixed and phones were still catching fire after Samsung deemed them safe.

By your logic, should Samsung provide a big warning on all of it's devices saying "we think they are safe but we aren't sure?" :rolleyes:

As far as the $100, not sure if it's a bribe or good will gesture.
 

KPOM

macrumors P6
Oct 23, 2010
17,436
6,845
And that is ONLY the cases in America, alas this post will be totally ignored by the raging Samsung hatred of an Apple fan. Some would totally forgive Apple if one of their devices caused the death of their entire family.
Any device or accessory is capable of failure. However the Note 7 is a classic case of a botched launch and clueless management. The CPSC criticized them for the initial recall (for not notifying them as required by law), and then it's obvious they jumped to conclusions about the cause and botched the re-release. They were lucky no one was killed. At least 96 devices failed out of 2.5 million in less than 2 months. That's 2 orders of magnitude higher than the normal failure rate.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
Or it's a sign of desperation. Perhaps lots more people are opting for refunds than they expected.

You think that Apple offered store credits all those times because they were desperate? Or you only see other companies with that lens?

"Samsung had a problem they couldn't figure out and stopped sales within a week".

Weeks. Next time, please edit a quote down to the line you're referring to. This goes for everyone, please. Too many people are quoting entire posts.

Seems to me a battery defect would be easy to determine, which makes me think it's not battery related but circuitry and/or battery defect.

Could be. It'll be interesting to see if they figure it out.

There's one critical piece of information we're all missing: what is the normal rate of fires for lithium powered handheld devices? I cannot seem to find any definitive answers.

It's certainly much higher than normally reported in news reports, which has not only become so used to lithium fires that it's usually not big news any more, but also ignores reports of passenger baggage fires that one can see in pilot reports.
 

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,889
15,034
In between a rock and a hard place
To me this post represents a false equivalency.
It's not a false equivalency. It's a direct response to the quote below by Genovelle:

"Not true at all. Safety recalls like this Samsung garbage has never happened with Apple products. If what you were saying was true then the government and safety advocates would have quickly jumped in." - Genovelle

@kdarling simply responded with evidence to the contrary.

It's a recall. There are thousands every year. This isn't like the Seals were broken. The Horsemen aren't on their way.:rolleyes:
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
Any device or accessory is capable of failure. However the Note 7 is a classic case of a botched launch and clueless management. The CPSC criticized them for the initial recall (for not notifying them as required by law),

For a Fast Track recall like this one, the CPSC gives ten working days to come up with documentation. Samsung beat that by a week.

Apple has also announced their own recall weeks before the CPSC gave the official recall notice. In fact, Apple did it earlier this year.
  • 2003 - 2015 - Apple gets reports of malfunctioning power adapters.
  • 2016 Jan 28 - Apple finally announces a recall, and begins replacements.
  • 2016 Feb 18 - THREE WEEKS after Apple's own announcement, CPSC announces the official recall.

and then it's obvious they jumped to conclusions about the cause and botched the re-release.

Apparently so.

At least 96 devices failed out of 2.5 million in less than 2 months. That's 2 orders of magnitude higher than the normal failure rate.

Really? You have a source for the normal failure rate? Links, please!
 

cdmoore74

macrumors 68020
Jun 24, 2010
2,413
711
Why do the Samsung users come to an Apple themed website?!...

I own both a S6 (which I'm trying to sale), iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone SE so technically I have the right to make a comment either way. I've owned a lot more Samsung devices then the majority of any of you. I don't play favorites and I call it like I see it. As for Samsung owners that hate iPhone's you should ask them directly.

That being said I've own 3 Note and 2 Galaxy devices. But during that time I still respected Apple and that is the reason why I currently own a iPhone 7 Plus as my daily driver today.
 
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