The Home Improvement Q&A Thread

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by puma1552, Jun 7, 2015.

  1. millerj123 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    #176
    My initial guess is that the panels are heat or flame retarding. MDF will not be. This is most likely not a good idea.
     
  2. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #177
    Ceiling fans-
    I am reminded of the saying, you get what you pay for. We have two beautiful ceiling fans purchased at a big box store about 3 months apart, 6 years ago. The price was good, about $100 each. Recently one of them got slower, then refused to start turning without a helpful push, and now it seems to be done.

    Ceiling fans have always struck me as something that go for a long time like 20 years. We have fans in our house that were here when we purchased the house in 2011 that maybe are 20 years old, and are still going strong. So for this fan, I’m wondering if this was a fluke of if the other fan is right behind it?

    I assume the motor brushes have worn out, and wonder if these things are capable of being repaired? Anyone with experience regarding this? Thanks!
     
  3. jeyf macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    #178
    may or may not solve the problem. Fans have one or two capacitors in them. If the fan not working fan is worth the effort; remove the caps and a well stocked homeDepot might have them. A skilled associate may be able to find them on homedepot.com for you. Call around different area lamp shops. There are a few youtubes on this.
     
  4. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #179
    Thanks, I’ll research this. :)
     
  5. ejb190 macrumors 65816

    ejb190

    #180
    Weight would be an issue. The drop ceilings rails are pretty light weight and (in my experience) not always anchored the best way. And keep in mind that the panels do occasionally fall out... MDF will also warp if exposed to any moisture, especially the thin stuff.

    Paint? MDF and the panels will both soak up paint like a sponge.

    I restored a shop with dropdown ceilings on the "cheep" a number of years ago. Might have been cheeper to just replace the ceiling from scratch by the time we were done!
     
  6. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #181
    Do they make MDF panels designed for this purpose? My impression is too heavy.
     
  7. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Sailing beyond the sunset
    #182
    I'm pretty sure most AC motors with low torque requirements will be induction motors, which don't have brushes.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_motor

    I'd look at the capacitors first, as @jeyf mentioned.
     
  8. tizeye macrumors 6502

    tizeye

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2013
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    #183
    Many times it is cheaper to buy new, particularly with lower end fans. Wile I will put them in office/small bedrooms, for master bedroom and living areas, I insist on Hunter. It is worth the little extra.
     
  9. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #184
    I have the fan manual, hence manufacturing contact number, so I’ll ask and see if it’s repairable.
     
  10. jeyf macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    #185
    given the age of the fan i doubt the manufacturer has any record. Most of that consumer stuff is a one time buy from a 3rd party and the whole lot came off a boat from Vietnam.

    call your Local hardware store say homeDepot and see if they even sell replacement fan capacitors. what values do they have. can they order online for you
    remove the blades, remove the motor housing and this will expose the capacitors. repair or replace, either way, you will have to tear down the fan
    get the value of the caps. Run the fan for a few minutes; are the caps. show any dis coloration.

    buy a new fan? consider product reviews form Amazon or homeDepot.com. Some of the new units are a hassle to install.
     
  11. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #186
    Good news, the fan is a Harbor Breeze brand name, Baja Ceiling Fan which has a life time warranty on the motor. I called the company today, described the issue, and they are sending me a condenser for free. Hopefully, this does the trick! :)
     
  12. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #187
    I’m making progress in my bathroom remodel project, getting ready to place the free standing tub, who’s only mechanical connection to anything is the drain. How are tubs like this typically secured to the floor, a bead of silicon caulk?
     
  13. jeyf, Sep 5, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019

    jeyf macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    #188
    i just installed a 3/4 size claw foot tub in the guest bathroom. It does not weigh as much as i thought and could move. Kinda worried.
    -i used ss braded portable water lines. they dont look as nice but offer peace of mind as the portable lines offer a un limited amount of water damage.
    -with a claw foot tub you can verify if the wast water is leaking and make changes.

    in your case:
    the bead of silicon sounds about right. if your tub did move you would be able to see it.
    you might get the tub in position and vertically up on 2x2" slats
    apply a lusty bead of silicone along the but bottom edge
    gently slide the slats out from the tub
     
  14. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #189
    According to the install instructions there is supposed to be a small gap between tub and the floor. It has adjustable feet inside the frame which are hidden. I figure I can place it and then apply the caulk in this gap. And I’ll take another look at the install instructions.
    Thanks!
     
  15. jeyf macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    #190
    I here what the manufacturer is saying! Put a dab of adhesive or a tiny double sided tape on diagonally opposite 2 of 4 feet if your concerned about the tub moving.
    or
    just do nothing and see how it works out, mark the tub's position on the floor and see if it moves.
    --- Post Merged, Sep 6, 2018 ---
    thought I would post here:
    I am looking for a flat panel LED fixture.
    -Size about 1x4' and less than 1" thick or about.
    -I am needing a color = 5000K and the LED device rated 30+ watts or possibly 3000+ lumens. Recall; a single old 40w florescent 4' tube emits 2600 lumens.
    -I need the led power supply integrated into the 1" thick housing. NOT looking to see the power supply protruding out the back side of the fixture as I am NOT mounting the fixture in a suspended ceiling but rather directly against residential dry wall.
    -Really want to buy it off of Amazon but just not seeing adequate product descriptions.
     
  16. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #191
    The capacitor came today, swapped it out, and I have my fan back. :)

    08A0A180-4CC9-4BBC-B322-D5A37186B554.jpeg
    Old capacitor with the wires cut off it. ​
     
  17. rhett7660 macrumors G4

    rhett7660

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Sunny, Southern California
    #192
    Most of the free standing tubs we have looked at and eventually purchased show a adhesive being used on the inside and then a bead of caulking around the outside. I would definitely check the manual to see what they recommend when installing the tub.
     
  18. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #193
    The manufacturer American Standard said to adjust the tub so it is 3/32 above the floor, by adjusting the feet, and then placing a bead of silicon caulk around the base, which I have down (Bathroom Remodel 2018 thread). It seems to be staying put. :)
     
  19. rhett7660 macrumors G4

    rhett7660

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Sunny, Southern California
    #194
    Then that is what I would use! Doesn't seem like much though huh! The one we purchased has an adhesive on the "feet" and then the caulking around the base. Seems like a fall or nice push would be able to move them. We haven't installed ours yet, I have only looked at the installation directions since we are getting close.
     
  20. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #195
    I installed this tub by myself, which was a challenge. I described it here: https://forums.macrumors.com/threads/bathroom-remodel-feb-2018.2107947/page-6#post-26507070

    I think the adhesive on the feet of the tub, would make it even more challenging because you’d need to set it exactly right. When I installed my tub, after it was down, I had to rotate it slightly to get it exactly parallel with the wall which is only a little over an inch away.
     
  21. jeyf macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    #196
    if you feel that the tub could move significantly mark it in a couple of places.
     
  22. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #197
    Replacing a pool pump
    Had the pleasure of replacing a pool pump today. Fortunately this pump was replaced once under warranty so I got to watch the pool people do it previously, so I realized the impeller housing does not have to be removed.

    This is a Pentair LA01N pump, used to run the automatic pool cleaner (Pentair Kreeoy Krauler Legend). I purchased it on Amazon for $250. The pool company would have charged $350 for the pump, and $125 to install, with a 2 year warranty. I purchased a 4 year warranty through Amazon for $15.

    FF538AEC-D544-4DE6-80F9-CB43ECBF8E23.jpeg

    However before purchasing a new pump, troubleshoot the original pump and realize this is a 220v pump with a double pole 20amp circuit breaker. If you are unfamiliar with working with electrical components, hire the pool people to do it. :p

    Check the electrical connection with a volt meter and make sure both phases are powered and/or the CB has not failed. Secondly, replace the capacitor (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor) which is a small cylinder that has two terminals and simply unplugs. It is found in the black protrusion on top of the pump. Two screws hold the cover on. These fail often and cause the pump to stop working. I’ve restored two pumps and a ceiling fan to working order by replacing the capacitor.

    A1268482-C683-4191-A58A-BB523B51042A.jpeg
    Capacitor


    Disconnect the electrical connection (top image) at the back of the pump.

    The pump impeller casing is tied into the pool piping (top image) and to replace that would be a real pain. However if the stainless nuts and bolts around the housing are removed (top image) the pump and it’s impeller can be easily removed (image below), leaving the impeller housing in place connected to the piping.

    F88E9B5B-FBC5-4CD0-AAAC-329267553A35.jpeg
    When the original pump is removed water from the pool filter will start to flow out slowly, so have the new pump ready to slide into place and reconnect the impeller housing nuts and bolts. Make sure the gasket on the pump half of the housing does not become dislodged when it is bolted to the impeller housing. Reconnect the electrical wires, and the exterior ground wire if there is one and hopefully you will have a pump that runs! :)
     
  23. tizeye macrumors 6502

    tizeye

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2013
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    #198
    I got lucky and thankfully didn't need to replace the pump. While this is a shallow well pump for sprinklers, #4 zone valve quit working and the pump was dry pumping creating the heat that distorted the PVC as well as the burnt color on the intake. Problem was low volt electrical wires from controller/timer to valves and when installing the new AC unit workers cut the wire. I had patched it but after a year or so, it stopped working. Valves are in two boxes (3 and 3) and the impacted wire was not the one next to the pump where easy to dig to, but the other side of the house and buried in the original trenching. Ran new wires for zones 4, 5 and 6 but up the house, through the attic and back down.

    The good news is, while I knew the pump ran, when I replace the damaged intake line and re-primed it, it pumped a geyser out the open outtake. Then just had to rebuild the outtake line.

    IMG_1783.JPG
     
  24. willmtaylor macrumors G3

    willmtaylor

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    A Natural State
    #199
    We have lived in our current house for ~9 mo.’s now and still have many unfinished projects. (It was built in 1994 and nothing had been updated since. E.g. original blue carpet in bathrooms.) While taking a break from finishing up some wainscoting/board and batten, wanted to spice up the master bedroom.

    The wall above our bed was blank, and we toyed with the idea of a DIY wooden headboard or accent wall, but after walking around IKEA, we discovered the idea of a bookshelf with photos or art hanging below. Got a local photographer to let us browse his nature landscapes and print one out in 3 pieces.

    Got it all hung this weekend and are really pleased with the finished product.

    Master Bedroom Headboard Art
    1B613F64-512E-4099-BEE1-E42603119A08.jpeg

    Board and Batten
    A66E07D1-BEEC-4302-8D08-78DD76B98E6C.jpeg
     
  25. Zenithal macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #200
    Hmm, don't see wainscoting on houses after a certain decade here. Are you in the midwest or east coast/south? I'm usually wary of early 90s builds because at the time there was some tomfoolery with contract home builders across the states. But any quality inspector would have picked up on cheaping out of materials.

    Looks good!
     

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