Other Would Apple have apologized about slowing down iPhones if nobody knew?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Hieveryone, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #126
    I read the whole thing and there is not mention of it. If its implied, it is badly stated.
     
  2. cyb3rdud3, Jan 2, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018

    cyb3rdud3 macrumors 65816

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    #127
    It is clearly in the release notes that power management is being employed. Reducing power to a CPU means you will underclock it. When it is underclocked you get less performance...

    It is all in the actual link provided, factual and totally inline with the apology issued by Apple recently.

    -- EDIT
    And with the same terminology as per the original release notes also in the most recent article as per the front page of this great website...
    https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...-passes-a-genius-bar-diagnostic-test.2098675/
     
  3. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #128
    Yes, I see. You dont trust the legal system but you trust a company that deceives their customers :D
    lol
    --- Post Merged, Jan 2, 2018 ---
    Lol :D
    You cant be serious.
    They came out apologizing for hiding it and you just sit here insisting that they told us about it before?
     
  4. temna macrumors 6502a

    temna

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    #129
    No, because if no one noticed, what is there to apologize about?
     
  5. brock2621, Jan 2, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018

    brock2621 macrumors 6502a

    brock2621

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    #130
    The amount of uproar on this is astounding. It's a lose lose situation. They lose with phones randomly reboot, or the code in something that prioritizing power and reduces based on demand in equivalency to what's available plain and simple. The iPhone 6 is almost half a decade old, the battery chemistry changes just like other phones. What they did was not only acceptable, but unbeknownst appreciated. The ONLY negative thing would be transparency in that they didn't tell anyone they were implementing this.
     
  6. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #131
    Really? Half a decade old?
    Try 3 years.
    And those symptoms started happening a little after a year into it for the iPhone 6 and 6S.
    Its clearly faulty batteries that needed to be replaced that's all.
    But they decide to avoid all that cost and did it the sneaky way by slowing down peoples devices.
    What they did was not acceptable and should have came out clean about it so the consumer has an option and idea to what is going on to their phone.
     
  7. brock2621 macrumors 6502a

    brock2621

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    #132
    It'll be 4 years this year, and not only that, you're not taking into account when the battery was first manufactured (and stored before being actually assembled). Even still, almost every other phone manufacturer from 2014 isn't doing anything with their batteries and the phones are rebooting or shutting down randomly. I'm not saying they are completely without fault, but for just the most part, people just texting or reading an email aren't going to notice a massive slowdown because of the battery. But when running benchmarks (like the Redditor that originally discovered this), the CPU is pushed to the max and the slowdowns are apparent.
     
  8. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #133
    They were released September 19, 2014.
    Not everyone bought them on release date and they were not all manufactured at the same time obviously. ;)
    Either way for batteries to just shut off like that its unacceptable and Apple obviously used junk or defective batteries. And then was hiding the truth about it and lying to their customers telling them their batteries are fine.
     
  9. brock2621 macrumors 6502a

    brock2621

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    #134
    I hear ya... my question would be WHEN would it be acceptable for your for the batteries to fail? Because at some point the chemistry wears down and the phone reboots either way unless there is a software fix to prevent it. At what year? 5? 6?

    That and which companies are ok not to let customers know and which ones should let them layout a blueprint on how they should handle it?
     
  10. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #135
    Within a few years or could be less depending on individual use.
    But when they fail I want the option to replace the battery and know about it instead of getting my device slowed down.
    That's all. Honesty shouldn't be that much to ask for.
    When my TV remove stops working I change the batteries and then it works again as the day I bought it. My TV doesn't slow down or screen quality degrades as the battery gets old. Get it?
     
  11. brock2621 macrumors 6502a

    brock2621

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    #136
    It's hard to pin down because it get progressively worse. My original iPhone only lasts 20 minutes now with messing around with it and trying to load webpages. I just replaced a 7 year old Samsung TV that completely crapped out with vertical lines etc. in it and although it sucked, I wasn't suing them. When is it ok for tech to diminish?

    The traditional idea is that when it craps out you go buy a new one, but now it's seemingly a progression of informational entitlement of to know ahead of time when something is failing. That in theory is great; it would be nice to know when my TV is about to fail rather than it just jumping the shark randomly some evening.

    I think personally 3 years is fair but it's completely up to interpretation. It seems for $29 people expect double that now after multiple lawsuits etc.

    I'm old (30's) so it's interesting to see the idea of people suing Nintendo in 1991 because they hate blowing out their cartridges because they are failing...
     
  12. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #137
    Lol :D
    Now you're mixing Apples with oranges.
    When is it ok for Tech to just diminish or crap out?
    That's up to the consumer to decide and if they spend $999+ for a device that diminishes within a year then that kind of approach is not acceptable.
    The consumer having the option to know their battery health and if it needs replacement shouldn't be much to ask for. And I should have a say weather I want my device to be slowed down or not.
    $29 battery replacement is great but all this change and new options where not available and never would have been unless this scam was discovered and Apple admitted to wrongdoing.
    So all this exposure and revelations are good for the consumer in the end. You're welcome :D
     
  13. cyb3rdud3, Jan 2, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2018

    cyb3rdud3 macrumors 65816

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    #138
    No you misunderstand, I don't distrust the legal system that is not what I said. I have every faith in that the system is administered fairly. It is the perceived culture of utilising the courts so often to resolve matters that I find odd. And not just that, also the patent system. The concept of class actions is simply more of an exception as generally normal regulatory bodies will have covered it already.

    And again you misunderstand, you can see it in the posts linked here they told us before, the apology explains they told us before, the release notes told us before. But as you can clearly, or perhaps not so clearly, see is that they apologise for it not being so clear. I mean even here on a slightly more technical forum some people like yourself and your 'liking' friends seem to find it hard to link their undisputable statement regarding the introduction of power management to the effect popularly called 'throttling'.
     
  14. Abs_p macrumors 6502a

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    #139
    Don't you already have an option to replace the battery? It's not liek your hands and legs are tied down and you are not allowed to replace the battery.

    Comparing your TV which runs on AC power to a CPU which is powered by a Li-ion battery is the best comparision you could come up with?

    I dont know about you but I Drive a Tesla, when the battery is low, I sometimes shut down the aircon and music system and then drive less aggressively to extend the range. That's what is happening here, that is a proper comparision .
     
  15. cyb3rdud3 macrumors 65816

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    #140
    Exactly - hence it is referred to as power management. And didn’t Tesla enable these advanced features for those owners who bought the entry level model without them, so that they had extra range and could get out of the hurricane danger zone.

    I totally get it if people’s phones truly take 3-10 seconds to do some as simple as answering a phone call, although I still have my doubts around the truth of those stories in context of this. I would be demanding a new phone as well as that is simply not acceptable. However, as generally is the case with situations like these, many people come out of the woodwork with all sorts of problems that they all link to this one story.
     
  16. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #141
    No, nobody has the option to replace their iPhone battery unless Apple approves it even if you just want to pay out of pocket. If it doesn't qualify using their little battery health app then they won't do it.
    And for most people opening their phone and doing it themselves or going to a random 3rd party shop with questionable parts and service is not an option.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 2, 2018 ---
    I just don't see them telling us much of what they were doing to our phones and mostly everyone out there didn't see or realize what they were doing.
    That's why all the bad publicity and negative uproar and lawsuits.
    But I'm confident and hope things will change to the better in the near future with some more transparency to the end user with what is really going on with their devices.
    And that's always a good thing being honest and telling the customer what is going on and giving them options to decide on their own.
    I think we can all agree to that;)
     
  17. Martyimac macrumors 65816

    Martyimac

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    #142
    Your post doesn't jive with what I am reading here, https://www.macrumors.com/2018/01/02/apple-replaces-iphone-batteries-that-pass-tests/

    Did I miss something?
     
  18. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #143
    Yes, now they just came out with this today.
    But for over 10 years that was never an option.
    And we're not sure how long they will continue to allow this to happen. Only till the end of 2018 for certain iPhones or will permanently change their policy?
    That is a great option to have though that we never had before until this big fiasco blew up:)
    So hope Apple is headed in the right direction in the future.
     
  19. Martyimac macrumors 65816

    Martyimac

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    #144
    Me too, but now I am cautious. Just a year ago I would recommend a Mac to anybody who asked.
    Today? Not so much.
     
  20. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #145
    Lol :D
    I can't blame you.
    Customer confidence and trust is easy to lose and negative publicity is hard to overcome.
    It takes time, actions and lots of effort to restore all that back.
     
  21. Darshizzle macrumors member

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    #146
    they only "apologized" because it was gonna get exposed. Damage control "apology"...but that damage control is doing more damage!

    I will not be recommending apple products for anyone that asks. I used to, but have lost confidence in the company. Im pretty sure Apple couldn't care less what I think.

    Hope those execs enjoy their huge bonuses and pay raises!

    https://www.thestar.com/business/20...cook-with-major-pay-rise-private-jet-use.html
     
  22. dkh587 macrumors regular

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    #147
    My opinion: Apple is falling off if they can't produce phones that don't require throttling because they will shut down. They need to step their game all the way up.

    I understand why, but it's not acceptable IMO
     
  23. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #148
    What is your current battery life looking like right now? Anything out of the ordinary?
     
  24. Applejuiced, Jan 3, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018

    Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    #149
    I have a 7 Plus bought on release date.
    Im around 93% with battery health but Im staying on iOS 10.3.3 for now. Dont want any new "features" added to my device :D
    My CPU is not throttled at all right now and that's why Im avoiding iOS 11.
     
  25. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #150
    I bought my 7 in November and it's at 87% battery health. I already have the "featured" installed as I'm at 11.2.1; however, that feature is not affecting me as much as I have an Apple Battery case that keeps full the internal battery at power.
     

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