Is this a concern?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by DrMotownMac, Aug 11, 2019.

  1. DrMotownMac macrumors 6502

    DrMotownMac

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    #1
    My Samsung/Android using friend just sent this article to me as part of his ongoing argument that iPhones are no more secure than Android phones. Is this something really to be concerned about? Is there a reason Apple has not fixed this after knowing about it for 4 years? I don't really understand how much of a security risk this is, but I'm sure many of you know much more about it than I do.

    Warning Issued For Apple's 1.4 Billion iPad and iPhone Users
     
  2. Jim Lahey macrumors 6502

    Jim Lahey

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    #2
    It seems like it's only a potential concern if an attacker has physical access to the device. On the whole I would say that for me, it's not a concern.
     
  3. DrMotownMac thread starter macrumors 6502

    DrMotownMac

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    #3
    Thank you, Jim. That's a better answer. That being said, it's still disconcerting that this guy wrote this for Forbes, literally saying that "1.4 billion iPad and iPhone users" need to be concerned. If Apple CAN fix this, they probably should. Even if it's just for PR purposes. I'm trying to convince my friend that he should switch to iOS from Android, and this article just gave him all the reasons he needs for never switching to iOS. Kind of frustrating. Almost as frustrating as that recent commercial on TV saying, "Mac Book says get a Surface Laptop." What a "pile of crap!" Sorry...that's just my opinion.

     
  4. tkukoc macrumors 65816

    tkukoc

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    #4
    I can't even begin to explain all the issues wrong with that article. There are always exploits in every iOS release no matter what device. But to claim these are "hacks" is such a joke. And no.. face ID was not "hacked" as they claim it was. Again software updates fix and break things all the time.
     
  5. willmtaylor macrumors G4

    willmtaylor

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  6. NoBoMac Moderator

    NoBoMac

    Staff Member

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    #6
    This.

    If it's a "Forbes" article with Apple in the title, just click bait. I won't waste the electrons to even skim the story.
     
  7. willmtaylor macrumors G4

    willmtaylor

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    #7
    Kelly plays one note—and it’s click bait, low-hanging fruit, axe-to-grind.

    Ok, so maybe it’s a chord, but it’s the same chord over and over and over again.
     
  8. DrMotownMac thread starter macrumors 6502

    DrMotownMac

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    #8
    Thank you, everyone. I appreciate the input. I had no idea who Gordon Kelly was nor that Forbes was clickbait. I guess that’s why my Samsung-using friend is the one who sent it to me.

    My apologies for wasting your time!
     
  9. velocityg4 macrumors 601

    velocityg4

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    #9
    While it may be an issue. It is a minor issue. Not only does it require physical access to the phone. It also requires the phone to be unlocked. Unless one is in the habit of handing their phone to unsavory characters with the skills to pull off this exploit, unlocking the phone for them and leaving them alone with the phone to do whatever they want. This isn't a concern.

    Then the article goes on to mention. Possible other vulnerabilities which may exist. Which could let someone gain access to the phone remotely then insert this code. There may be some unknown exploit which could allow this. But it would require an extreme concerted effort. Even the FBI has to have physical access to an iPhone and use a box like from Grayshift to break into it.

    When it comes to random password stealing efforts. They go through spam e-mail and bogus websites. Hoping people will open a piece of malware or type their password into a decoy website. It's much easier and will produce more results. So, just like any other computer. iPhone security comes down to the user. Don't open random links or download and open random files you get in your e-mail or via text message.
     
  10. Newtons Apple macrumors Core

    Newtons Apple

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    #10
    I will take Apple any day over Android! I do not trust google and do all I can to stay away from their products.

    Google is an enemy of America as far as I am concerned!
     
  11. AustinIllini macrumors demi-goddess

    AustinIllini

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    #11
    I wouldn't go that far. It's a trade off.

    Google Pixel is open source secure. iPhone is realistically equally secure.
    Google spys on you. Apple claims they value your privacy

    however

    Google has a web site where you can view and delete the data they store for you. Apple was listening to your Siri conversations without your permission and there is no way to manage or delete those recordings.

    Google isn't an enemy of America. Apple is only privacy focused insofar as they can sell you their products.
     
  12. Newtons Apple macrumors Core

    Newtons Apple

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    #12
    So think google is telling the truth and you can delete ALL of the data on you?

    I agree both Apple and Android got problems but I will take Apple.

    As long as google works with the chinese they should be treated like an enemy.

    I am done on this as we will not be able to convince the other and we are WAY OFF TOPIC.

    Enjoy!
     
  13. NoBoMac, Aug 12, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019

    NoBoMac Moderator

    NoBoMac

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    #13
    +1000

    Old saying out there, in various forms, but basically goes: if it's a computing device and usable/accessible, it's vulnerable.

    As mentioned, be smart, and assess one's level of concerns, as will never be 100% secure. Or, relax, enjoy your gizmo (but be smart).
     
  14. I7guy macrumors Core

    I7guy

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    #14
    Maybe shame on apple for not fixing this bug. However, this seems to be a hard to execute exploit requiring physical access to the phone. Maybe Apple will now patch this exploit now that it is out in the open.
     
  15. AustinIllini macrumors demi-goddess

    AustinIllini

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    #15
    I probably would, too but put your cards on the table here. Apple is only somewhat more trustworthy due to their marketing message.
     
  16. marzfreerider macrumors regular

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    Canada
    #17
    It's not the first time it has taken Apple a lot of time to fix bugs or something even bigger. No platform is 100%. At the end of the day all businesses want is your money. To say Apple is better because they market as caring about your privacy is comical, they don't care, it helps them sell. Even BlackBerry in the day worked with law enforcement. If they truly cared they wouldn't give into countries with less than stellar records on human rights and other issues. I have used both platforms and each has their own merits. If you truly believe Apple cares about your privacy then good for you, I trust no company. In the end it's just a good marketing ploy. But for them to leave this that long is sad.
     

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16 August 11, 2019