Some Users Report Adobe Premiere Pro Issue Causing Blown Out MacBook Pro Speakers

Discussion in 'MacRumors.com News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. Zenithal, Feb 6, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019

    Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #101
    Ah, yes, Mr. iPad and his fantasies. :p But, yeah, you hit the nail on the head. Adobe is not stupid.


    I'm not going to deny Serif's products are good. They are good. They have polish. But they're not going to be adopted industry(ies) wide. I just don't see it.

    I don't know about the other two software mentioned as I've never heard of them. I'll have to check them out on the app store.



    In a way, it's also why Filmic Pro is the defacto standard film app on iOS or Android to be used with a flagship phone if you want to take great video and access controls to the phone's camera the OS doesn't let you otherwise.


    I guess in a way it's also why Adobe's mobile device software isn't as highly used or rated at say Snapseed. Adobe has a name to go by here, but Snapseed is sort of like Photoshop Elements with some more features whereas the Photoshop for iOS or Android is terrible, and is no better than the plethora of cheap apps out there.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 6, 2019 ---
    Serif Europe, the company behind them, has existed for 30 years. They've never been a threat to Adobe. I own Designer and Photo licenses. They're alright software, but they're not used widely enough to make a dent. Adobe knows they're the industry standard in most fields. It's why Adobe has a very relaxed policy on piracy when it comes to private individuals, but will be harsh on business using them. Once you get hooked onto the sweet sap of Adobe's intoxicating drug, you're hooked for life. Especially if you work in a field where you need the defacto standard.

    Foxit can create PDFs or open them, but the software still has issues pushing/converting bug free PDFs. And Foxit and similar have been around for over a decade now. No bueno.


    Does anyone remember Swish Zone's software, Swish Max for Windows and OSX? The company that was going to beat Adobe (before them Macromedia) at their own game? Forgotten relic of the past.

    And with flash dying for good in 2020, there's no need for a new competitor. When Illustrator and After Effects are excellent tools for animations.
     
  2. Baymowe335 Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2017
    #102
    McDonald’s costs $5 and serves its purpose. They aren’t going there for a fantastic quality meal.
     
  3. cocoua macrumors regular

    cocoua

    Joined:
    May 19, 2014
    Location:
    madrid, spain
    #103
    My gosh!! Apple please stop glueing all to one piece!!

    We dont care about the less 1mm you are saving and we hate you for that.

    Time will tell you

    We just need a decent OS to compite wit your MacOS, then all we will abandon you
    --- Post Merged, Feb 6, 2019 ---
    Apple care for how long?? Stupid solution ever.
    Pay pay pay

    The big problem is apple glueing things just for saving money and a few nanometers
     
  4. pmau macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    #104
    Yes.
    Four Philips screws to remove the back cover. Two screws on each speaker attached to the topcase.
    That would be it.
     
  5. Tobby macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2017
    Location:
    Norway
    #105
    This is common? Happened to me last year on MBP 15" 2017, got the speakers replaced though.
     
  6. pmau macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    #106
    Not meant to correct you, but believe me. Fast Food chains have the highest quality standards.

    The cannot afford bad press if hundreds of people get sick.
    They throw away everything that does not look perfect.

    McDonalds and Burger King etc. would loose Millions of dollars within hours if they would not care.
    Apple sells you whatever.
     
  7. Zdigital2015 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2015
    Location:
    East Coast, United States
    #107
    Yes, Mr. iPad is back! In my mind it was over once Adobe acquired Aldus and then Macromedia. None of those products survived and who the hell even cares about Quark...they became irrelevant once InDesign gained enough traction and integration with Photoshop and Illustrator to make Quark the odd man out.

    I have yet to use Premiere Rush CC, although I have it on my iPad Pro. It does require a CC subscription, which I have, so I need to check it out. Filmic Pro and Luma Fusion are a powerful combination, but only to a point.

    Photoshop on iOS will be a make or break to me, but I think its success is more important to Apple than Adobe. The Creative Cloud works on both macOS and Windows, while Adobe dominates the market. So far, their iOS game has been hit and miss, more like a hobby. We will see how if Photoshop gains actual traction in the mobile market. Apple has to up their game with iOS 13.

    Meanwhile, the topic was a blown speaker and whose fault it is...and how can blown speakers cost $600 to replace...SMH.
     
  8. warp9 macrumors member

    warp9

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2017
    #108
    Back in the IRC days, there was a thing called bitchslap.exe that you could trick someone into downloading. It would intercept the cpu fan signal, turn it off, and peg the cpu to max until it melted. This was back before heatsinks were the size of pickup trucks.
     
  9. Baymowe335 Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2017
    #109
    There is a difference between quality and cleanliness.
     
  10. deevey macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2004
    #110
    While initially it sounds like Apple are to blame, if you up the gain stage too much of any amplifier you are going to blow speakers. And from the sounds of it, the software has an audio bug that is doing precisely that.

    I honestly hope Adobe fronts the bill if its found definitively that Premier is the culprit.

    However. I gotta agree that it is extremely bad engineering making the speaker assembly so inaccessible that it costs $600 to repair!

    Anyone in a hot / humid climate will knows that speakers on any decent (especially Mac) laptops simply do not last that long. Not due to high volumes either!

    I used an external Soundcard and studio monitors for 99% of my MacBooks Life and I still ended up replacing my 2009 MacBook subwoofer assembly a total of 3 times in 8 years as the rubber / foam surround perished every few years - the retina MacBooks appear to use exactly the same kind of rubber coned speakers that were used in the 2009 model subwoofer.
     
  11. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #111
    I can run badly engineered songs on my expensive monitors and they don't blow. :)
     
  12. fmillion macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    #112
    How is it that the laptop's speakers are so fragile that playing some loud audio might damage them permanently, and Apple's awesome attention to detail didn't consider this in the hardware and prevent it? It would quite easy even in software to detect potentially damaging audio output and lower the volume and/or mute the speakers... Did Apple never test their audio subsystem with extreme cases to see what happens?
     
  13. nt5672 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #113
    Not quite right. If you, the user, select a speaker to run with an independent amplifier then yes, you are correct. You can select either a larger amplifier than the speaker can handle or a smaller speaker than the amplifier expects. Also if you get the wrong impedance, then you can blow either.

    But that does not apply here. Apple designed, or at least was supposed to design, the entire circuit to work together (amplifier and speaker). This should have included protection for the speakers, which are needed for class D amps during turn on. These same protections should also protect the speaker against large signals. These protection are build into amplifier chips these days, but they don't have to be used or they can be used incorrectly. Or if one is worried about cost the protections can be ignored.

    Here is the thing. Computer engineers are not audio engineers, so my guess is that the circuit was not designed by someone who knew what they were doing, or else this would not be happening. It's a simple design calculation and a few components to prevent the problem. Something one would expect on a high end laptop.
     
  14. KPandian1 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    #114
    I wouldn't be harsh to judge the people behind these speakers - they have to be audio engineers to get the quality of audio we experienced so far.

    I think this defect is another victim of Apple's quest for thinness.

    Anorexia is proven to be a killer, Apple:mad:.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 6, 2019 ---
    I don't know if the moderators are aware, but this rash is in almost all threads, posting this exact nonsense, off-topic post about Apple's wealth and health. We could be discussing the temperature of the surface of the sun, this will post about $20 billion "quarterly" earnings Apple.

    Never will logic be found in the posts - just chants of the magic of Apple's wealth. Any chat back is futile in trying to bring debating skills into the conversation.
     
  15. nt5672 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    #115
    Granted you could very well be correct.

    But audio amplifiers these days are single chip wonders with a half dozen discreet components. The discrete components have very little effect on the quality. They are mostly isolation, power, and ground noise protections.

    You don't need to be an audio engineer to take the manufacturers recommended design circuit and copy it onto the circuit board. Now the manufacturers recommended design circuits are usually for product test and not full featured. You'd have to be an audio engineer to know that. Now add a purchasing agent that only has to find a speaker with the right size and impedance and does not really understand power, RMS power, peak power, etc. then you have recipe for bad product design. It works, until it doesn't.
     
  16. falainber macrumors 65816

    falainber

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Location:
    Wild West
    #116
    Never buy the devices that require extended warranties. It's just a rip off and poor design.
     
  17. InuNacho macrumors 65816

    InuNacho

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location:
    In that one place
    #117
    Lol, Adobe has been releasing bugs instead of actual software since they went to the subscription model.
     
  18. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #118
    Require or offer? An extended warranty is never required with any Apple device. It is, however, offered. Apple isn't the first nor the last company in the last 30 years to offer extended warranties for electronics. No company has required the purchase. Depending on the retailer you purchase from, they may slap on an extended warranty for free, such as Costco, who has a no questions asked return policy. Many credit cards further extend a standard warranty. What will you say to those?
     
  19. falainber macrumors 65816

    falainber

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Location:
    Wild West
    #119
    Does this "bug" blow up the speakers on all laptops or just on the ones "designed in California"?
     
  20. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #120
    You expect too much from Apple. I'd like to think Ive has all the various engineers in animal cages.
     
  21. falainber macrumors 65816

    falainber

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Location:
    Wild West
    #121
    See the post I replied to which claimed that you have to ALWAYS buy Apple Care (meaning that Apple products require extended warranty).
     
  22. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #122
    I did. I wasn't sure he was serious or he'd left planet earth. The reality is in an age where an OEM solders everything to a board, you kind of have to get the extended warranty. If one thing breaks, you can't easily replace it through an authorized dealer or yourself. Long gone are the days of 24 hour repair services at an Apple store.

    I had a 2008 MBP. The big bulky kind before they got streamlined. In the two months after that, I had to have the bulk of the computer repaired or replaced because it simply stopped working. That was in the Jobs' era, back when he was a fighter and cared about quality.

    Point is, Apple was never about quality. They provided a product. Had they cared about quality, they wouldn't have made rubbish then or now. The same is applicable to just about any electronic that has become difficult to repair yourself. I owned a few more Mac laptops since then and bought the new Pro a couple years ago with Apple Care extended. I'm going to sell this off ASAP.

    While a large monetary bill wouldn't cause me to be remotely worried, I question a company's intent on creating a faulty product and knowingly doing so and also pushing said product.
     
  23. tehStickMan macrumors regular

    tehStickMan

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2018
    Location:
    Australia
    #123
  24. KPandian1, Feb 6, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019

    KPandian1 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    #124
    Apple has always been about quality - they chose to back up their products' quality with the warranty, up until recently with reasonable price.

    AC+ - robbery. Deductible!

    Computers, especially laptops, are new, expensive and fragile by nature - only 3 decades old. Apple designed and produced the best - with full knowledge that they can fail. Which is why I like their service, even without the AppleCare extension.

    The more fragile the manufacturing design, the worse the product; this is why the pursuit of thinness has led to so much defects. And, the soldering of components, fused design, all contribute to expensive replacement cost - to Apple. Even speakers are fragile. Plus the life beyond the AC+ covered period is near nil now - the 2015/2016 models will flood the secondhand market for dimes on the dollar soon - if they are alive.

    That is the killer - the pre-2015 models had problems, but were repairable. And got new life with new SSDs. Not so now.
     
  25. Gravydog316 macrumors 6502

    Gravydog316

    Joined:
    May 17, 2016
    Location:
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    #125
    No. it is Adobe's fault, which isn't covered.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 6, 2019 ---
    Well, it does.
    This is an example.
     

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