Things YOU Like/Dislike about macOS

Discussion in 'macOS Sierra (10.12)' started by Uni Grad, Sep 16, 2016.

  1. Uni Grad macrumors 6502a

    Uni Grad

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    #1
    The title speaks for itself. What are things that we like about MacOS, what are things we don't and what are things we wish for to be incorporated into upcoming version?
     
  2. !!! macrumors 6502

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    #2
    Why are there so many tags on this? It has nothing to do own Kaby or Sky Lake.
     
  3. Uni Grad, Sep 16, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2016

    Uni Grad thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Uni Grad

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    #3
    How does MacOS have nothing to do with KabyLake or SkyLake, CPUs on which the OS will run?
     
  4. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

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    #4
    The lack of a setting to change the default behavior of the green button back to pre-10.10, the lack of a system-wide dark mode, the exclusion of the previously-rumored ability to unlock MacOS with iPhone Touch ID.

    That's all I can think of right now. Obviously this thread is oriented toward software rather than hardware, hence why the hardware tags look a bit out-of-place.
     
  5. leman macrumors 604

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    Oct 14, 2008
    #5
    Some things I dislike: lack of transparency in Apple's decision process and some missing features in the stock software configuration (e.g. can't copy attachments from Mail). When you go deep into the system, many things are undocumented and the behaviour is unclear. There can be some improvements in quality control and care about low-level, fundamental stability. Only limited exposure of GPU functionality and difficulty in cross-platform development for apps that utilise it.

    What I like: rich set of features which make OS X literally the best OS for someone who needs to multitask. Full OS-level scriptability. Stock software (which is simply best in-class). Well-designed, consistent UI. UNIX. Network diagnostics features. Rich developer APIs. Spotlight. Quicklook. Airdrop. The fact that the core of OS X is open source. High quality of software implementation.
     
  6. TJCooperGB macrumors newbie

    TJCooperGB

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    Jun 18, 2016
    #6
    Design on the notification centre. I don't understand the point of giving us a 'Dark Mode' when it only applies to three elements - the notification centre now stands out like a sore thumb and many (stock) widgets are rather difficult to read at a glance.
     
  7. grahamperrin macrumors 601

    grahamperrin

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    Jun 8, 2007
    #7
    Disk Utility

    Wrong, wrong, wrong, nearly slain by the feature thief, a mess, shockingly poor (ten pages of criticisms), terrible, sacrificed, crippled, buggy as **** (barely disguised profanity in Apple Developer Forums), and so on.

    Disk Utility is probably the best example of why I decided to jump ship before Yosemite was released.

    Abandonment of title bars for titled content

    As far as I know, the willful abandonment began with Safari in pre-release Yosemite. At WWDC, AppKit Software Engineer Chris Dreessen correctly observed, "the title of the window isn't there" and so, for example, this screen shot of Safari with its 'Smart Search Field' fails to show the title of the presentation during which his words were spoken –
    Safari with no title.png
    – and at the same conference, Apple contradicted itself by behaving as if the search field is a title bar.​

    That sloppiness by Apple was one of a number of green lights for other developers to not show due care in their designs and so, for example, Upthere Home sometimes shows what might be a title for some types of titled content, but never shows the name of an image file when focused on that file. Now there's the abandonment with Console in pre-release Sierra. Most other Apple applications in Sierra were ignored by me …

    … if other Apple applications and third party applications are affected now, or in the future, I'll not be surprised.


    Safari: Command-L

    Visual clutter. Distractions – most of what overtakes the window is entirely unrelated to what I want.

    That's not my idea of a 'smart' field.


    Console

    It's no longer intuitive.


    Apple's overarching ill-fitting one-size-fits-all mentality

    In the words of third party developers "… hope you enjoy Flavours 2 Lite, which is, probably, the last breath of theming on OS X.".
     
  8. bbnck macrumors 6502

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    Mar 19, 2009
    #8
    I agree with @redheeler, the inability to change the behaviour of the green button so it zooms the window rather than full screens is really rather irritating. Apple doesn't seem to care about what we want either, since two years on they haven't bothered to add a toggle switch in System Preferences. However since OS X Lion they have a nifty pointless feature where you can remove the dots displayed below open applications on the Dock so you have no clue what apps are open and what aren't, but nothing to change behaviour of the green button. Priorities, right? :)
     
  9. grahamperrin macrumors 601

    grahamperrin

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    #9
    The unalterable behaviour fits some people. So it fits you, right? :)

    Another satisfied customer! Now if you'll just move along, please, madam, I'll be free to attend to the next person in this queue of dissatisfied customers. One size fits all! Have a nice day …
     
  10. bbnck, Sep 17, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2016

    bbnck macrumors 6502

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    Mar 19, 2009
    #10
    Try double-clicking the title bar in iTunes, and you'll see it doesn't "zoom" like it should. I noticed this was still not working in Sierra, and I'd have thought Apple would have caught on by now that it's something they need to fix. Unless they think it's not something that needs to be fixed. ;)

    I like OS X/macOS, just venting some annoyances :).
     
  11. RumorSeeker macrumors member

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    Nov 30, 2013
    #11
    I hate the total disrespect shown to us as Mac users by the name itself, mac, come on Apple, we know you don't care about us but at least capitalize the name, MacOS Sierra.
     
  12. dogslobber macrumors 68020

    dogslobber

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    #12
    I simply refuse to call it anything other than OS X, for that's what it is. This macOS nonsense is a marketing gimmick and the internal engineering staff sure don't call it macOS like that. It's crazy to give up its unique identity over some unclear connection to watches and iPhone OSs.
     
  13. davidcmc macrumors 6502

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    Nov 5, 2009
    #13
    The removal of the ability to disable a built-in display when an external one is attached (I remember OS X had this feature in Snow Leopard).
     
  14. leman macrumors 604

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    Oct 14, 2008
    #14
    What do you mean by "unclear connection"? It's literally one and the same OS with different user-facing UI frameworks slapped on top of it.
     
  15. Traverse macrumors 603

    Traverse

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    #15
    This is a nice feature in Windows
     
  16. Uni Grad thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Uni Grad

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    #16
    It's gone! I didn't know that was gone! After my MB died in 2009, which I bought in '06, I've only been using an iMac, and those don't allow external hookups, so I nvr tried using an external setup since '08 really.

    That's just lousy. Waste of battery.
     
  17. davidcmc macrumors 6502

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    Nov 5, 2009
    #17
    And waste of GPU processing power.

    Even if you set a static image to be displayed on the built-in display, there's a noticeable loss of graphic performance.

    I think Apple is trying to force people to use their Retina displays.
     
  18. dogslobber macrumors 68020

    dogslobber

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    #18
    Works here on my MBA with Sierra. No built in display when the lid is closed.
     
  19. davidcmc macrumors 6502

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    Nov 5, 2009
    #19
    I forgot to mention: "with the lid opened".
    What you're doing is called clamshell mode, which is officially supported by Apple.

    I'm referring to an old option OS X used to have that would allow the user to disable the built in display, with the MacBook opened, when an external display is connected.

    This is an important way to avoid the heat produced by the laptop internals to hit the built-in display when the laptop is closed and still operating.
     
  20. dogslobber, Sep 19, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2016

    dogslobber macrumors 68020

    dogslobber

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    #20
    I had a MacBook for 4 years but must confess I never tried such functionality. I recall the MB white colored machine shouldn't have been used with screen down. Btw, the iBook used to only mirror the internal display to external monitor. You kids don't realize how good you have it.
     
  21. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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    #21
    I am pretty sure they do actually. After all, the Mac OS was called "Mac OS" for many years, then "Mac OS X", then "OS X" and now "macOS". Apart from the newest naming scheme, guess what it was called for the shortest time.
     
  22. dogslobber macrumors 68020

    dogslobber

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    #22
    The crappy OS from before Steve 2 is a different beast. The current OS run on Macs is and never was a derivative of that. You can guess what it's internally called if you want. macOS is a marketing driven direction and got more than a few face palms when disclosed.
     
  23. davidcmc macrumors 6502

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    #23
    Correcting your post: "how good you USED TO HAVE IT".

    Let me reiterate: the feature that I'm asking Apple to REimplement used to be in OS X back in Leopard (or Snow Leopard, I don't remember exactly).

    I could just plug an external display, keep my MBP 2010 opened and disable the built-in MBP display so I could only use the external one.

    Now, the only way to do this is by the "clamshell mode", which forces us to close the MacBook. I don't like this method because high demanding tasks produce heat inside the laptop chassis and I don't like the idea of my MBP display being so close to that heat.

    If I want to use an external display with my MacBook opened, Apple (now) forces me to also use the Retina built-in display. This is a big waste of processing resource.
     
  24. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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    #24
    Wow, who pissed on your sugar cube today? Mac OS 9 was a marvel to use, too bad you obviously haven't tried it much. And Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X had a loooot over things in common. And yes I can guess all I want, but if you don't care about it, then you shouldn't have brought it up. :p macOS is a marketing ploy... But OS X wasn't. Got ya... :rolleyes:
     
  25. MacsRgr8 macrumors 604

    MacsRgr8

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    The Netherlands
    #25
    Indeed.
    Apple got their nickers in the twist once iOS 9 -> iOS 10
    Hoe do you call both OS'es?

    "Eye Oh Es Ten"
    "Oh Es Ten"

    Should simply have kept "Mac" before OS X 10.7 and later.
     

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